The two Hebrew Bible readings this week are both narratives of fatalism: Kings looks back to the inevitable fall of Israel from the Judean captivity, and Ezekiel looks forward to the inevitable fall of Jerusalem from the Israelite captivity. And Mary, mother of Jesus, preaches up a storm in Luke's gospel.

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We briefly touched on the Magnificat last year, and this year we're getting stuck in - and taking in Zechariah's hymn of blessing (the Benedictus) as well. Includes a quick shout-out to the other two hymns at the start of Luke's gospel.

We're also doing some light form criticism in Ezekiel, to pick apart the way in which the passage is constructed as a piece of literature. With that in mind, we're better placed to consider how we as readers should approach this oracle.

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References

Long, Burke O. (1991). 2 Kings, Forms of the Old Testament Literature series. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans.
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Bovon, Fran├žois (2002) tr. Thomas, Christine M. Luke 1: A Commentary on the Gospel of Luke 1:1-9:50, Hermeneia — A Critical and Historical Commentary on the Bible. Minneapolis, MN: Fortress Press.
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Zimmerli, Walter (1969), tr. Clements, Ronald E (1979). Ezekiel 1: A Commentary on the Book of the Prophet Ezekiel, Chapters 1-24, Hermeneia — A Critical and Historical Commentary on the Bible. Minneapolis, MN: Fortress Press.
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Evans, Craig A. (1990). Luke, Understanding The Bible Commentary Series. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books.
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Links

alternative histories (2017/10/29), a look at the King Uzziah narrative from the Chronicler's viewpoint

testament and testimony (2017/10/01), poetic and hyperbolic imagery in prophetic texts
alternative histories (2017/10/29)

Tags

REF, FRMOTLIT12KI2, HRMNEIA63ALK, HRMNEIA26AEZE, NIBCNT63LU